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Caring for your Aloes

General

  • Sunbird Aloes can be grown successfully in containers, provided cognizance is taken of the ultimate size of the plant. Nothing stops a gardener...

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  • Cold is the unpredictable factor when growing aloe hybrids. Often a few meters’ difference in location can either mean frost damage or none at all...

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  • Most people (and birds) enjoy the winter flowering aloes because there is little else to brighten the landscape at that time of year. Winter is...

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  • Rejuvenation is called for whenever an aloe becomes too tall and/or top heavy to remain upright. The first warning signs may be a plant that is...

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  • All the Sunbird Aloes are drought tolerant. Even though they can go through long periods without water (you can go on holiday without worrying...

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Ongoing care

  • Before cutting shoots, ensure that the plant is dry and will remain so for 2 or 3 days. Water plants in pots 24 hours before cutting. If the...

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  • To decide whether or not to remove stem shoots, consider the following: 1. Allowing stem shoots to develop will change the appearance of the plant...

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Pests and diseases

  • These pests over winter in protected areas on a variety of plants, and become active as soon as the worst winter cold has passed or even during...

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  • This may be caused by a variety of fungal or bacterial infections, and is more likely when plants are under stress due to excessive moisture or...

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  • The mite that causes the abnormal growths cannot be seen with the naked eye, which makes it difficult to control before it has infiltrated your...

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  • This very common pest is easily identified by the tell-tale, small pale markings left on the surface of the aloe leaf. The leaf may eventually be...

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  • This is a very aggressive fungus that attaches itself to any part of the leaf surface. When established, it starts showing as a yellow spot below...

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  • This is aloe enemy number one, so quick and decisive action is required whenever they are noticed. The beetle itself is about 1,2 cm long (varies...

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  • White scale starts with what looks like a coin sized spot of white dust. It will gradually cover more and more of the leaf upper and lower surface...

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